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Korg Modwave Wavetable Synthesizer

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Original price £699.00 - Original price £699.00
Original price
£699.00
£699.00 - £699.00
Current price £699.00

Synthesis powerhouse with distinctive wavetable timbres, Kaoss Physics, and Motion Sequencing 2.0.

 modwave synthesis engine 

When we call the wavetable oscillators "deep," we are not kidding. Start with over 200 wavetables, each containing up to 64 waveforms—from thousands of individual waves. Use the 30+ Modifiers to change their basic character, and the 13 Morph Types to process them in real-time. Create new hybrids from any two wavetables using the unique, realtime A/B Blend. Quick math: that's over 230 million wavetable variations out of the box, and that’s before you even add modulation. No need to stop there, though! Load your own custom wavetables in Serum or WaveEdit formats; there's room for thousands more*. Or, layer wavetables with samples from the built-in, multi-gigabyte PCM library.
*via Editor/Librarian software

Each Program has two full-featured wavetable oscillators, plus a sub oscillator/noise generator and any of a dozen stereo filter types, including the aggressive MS-20, sweet Polysix, and the newly enhanced Multi Filter. Animate almost any parameter using the massively flexible modulation system, with four triggerable envelopes, five LFOs, dual mod processors and two key-track generators–plus multi-lane Motion Sequencing and Kaoss Physics.

Even with all that synthesis power, playing up to four simultaneous wavetables per voice in a single Program, the modwave still achieves 32-voice polyphony, incredible for a wavetable synth. Layer two Programs together for double the possibilities.

 

Kaoss Physics 

Kaoss Physics models a ball rolling on a surface and/or bouncing off walls. Start the ball by flicking a finger on the x/y pad, or launch the ball automatically using a trigger source such as Gate + Damper. You can also directly control the ball by holding your finger on the pad. The position of the ball produces four modulation signals, which can be used to control any modulation destination you like: the X and Y locations, the distance from the center, and the angle relative to the X axis. This method of applying automated modulation is a first, and the results are modulations that are engrossing and evolving.

There is a bump in the virtual surface, going either down or up, like a valley or a hill. You can set the height or depth of the bump, and choose one of several different shapes for its slopes. The surface has adjustable friction, so that the ball slows down as it travels. There are walls on the four sides of the surface, and when the ball hits a wall, it bounces off. Walls can slow down the ball, as if they were padded, or accelerate the ball, like bumpers in a pinball machine. The walls can also be removed entirely, so that the surface wraps around to the opposite edges like a vintage arcade game.

The modeled environment can create specific modulation effects. For instance, use a centered bump with negative height so that the modulation values always eventually return to 0. Or, position a bump with positive height on a side or a corner, to push modulation values away from that zone

Most parameters, including Tilt, Friction, Time, Bump Height and Position, etc. are modulatable. You can even modulate them from the Kaoss Physics outputs—for instance, try modulating Tilt X with Kaoss Y. The result is an interactive controller that amplifies your physical gestures, transforming them into complex musical results. Did we mention that it's fun, too?

 

Motion Sequencing 2.0

Motion Sequencing 2.0 is evolved from the wavestate’s Wave Sequencing 2.0. Timing, Pitch, Shape, and four sets of Step Sequence values are separated into “Lanes,” each with their own loop start and loop end, adding a deeper, more customizable level of phrase and modulation recording.

Every time the sequence moves forward, the individual Lanes are combined to create the output. For instance, a step sequence value may be matched with a different duration, pitch, and shape every time that it plays. You can modulate each Lane’s loop points separately for every note, using velocity, LFOs, envelopes, Mod Knobs, or other controllers. Each note in a chord can be playing something different!

Lanes can also randomize the step order every time they play. Finally, individual steps can be randomly skipped, with a modulatable probability from 0 to 100%. The result is organic, ever-changing sounds that respond to your control. The dual onboard arpeggiators can interact with Motion Sequences for even more possibilities.